What is a Willow tree?

Willows are an introduced species of deciduous trees that have invaded thousands of kilometres of riverbanks and wetlands in Australia. Willow trees are considered one of the worst weeds in Australia as they spread very easily and are extremely invasive, and have a detrimental impact to the environment.

Why should willow trees be removed?

If Willows are not removed, they grow very quickly and will spread their roots and grow across the channel bed of creeks and rivers which slows down the flow of water, reduces the health of the water and causes erosion to vulnerable bank areas. In addition, they require large amounts of water and when they drop their leaves, a large amount of sediment and organic matter is deposited in the channel. All of this negatively impacts the health of the watercourses, reduces the habitat for native plants and animals and negatively affects the look of the surrounding areas.

How is Mittagong Creek being rehabilitated?

The Mittagong Creek Rehabilitation Project is a long-term plan to rehabilitate one of the most significant and treasured waterways in the Southern Highlands.

The project is guided by the Mittagong Creek Riparian Management Plan and funded principally through Council's Environment Levy and project partners including South-East Local Land Services.

Learn more at www.wsc.nsw.gov.au/services/environment/get-involved/rivercare/mittagongcreek

How can I support the rehabilitation work?

The long-term success of the Mittagong Creek Rehabilitation Project depends on strong community support and the commitment of local residents, particularly those who live along the creek or use it’s recreational spaces regularly.

Local residents keen to see the creek restored back to health are encouraged to become part of the Friends of Mittagong Creek, a small group of friendly volunteers who are assisting Council and other local residents with on-the-ground projects. 

Learn more at www.wsc.nsw.gov.au/MittagongCreek or call Wingecarribee Shire Council on (02) 4868 0888

What if a Willow is located on the bank?

We understand that vegetation can be important to reduce bank erosion and maintain bank stability. Wherever we find removing a Willow may affect the bank, we will consider replacing it with native Australian species that will not only improve the health, but also improve the overall look of the waterway and surroundings.