Waste Wise in Wingecarribee

Consultation has concluded

We're interested in your waste!

Wingecarribee Shire Council recognises the importance of working in partnership with the community to manage, reduce and avoid waste. Wingecarribee currently tops the State for recycling but we can still do better.

From time to time, Waste Wise in Wingecarribee will seek the opinion of residents. You will be able to complete surveys that will help us work together on reducing our waste to landfill. These surveys will contribute to how we undertake waste management in our Shire. Please take a few minutes to complete them and let us know how you are going with your domestic waste management.

Our Green Garden Bin and Community Recycling Centre surveys have concluded.

Also, Wingecarribee’s Waste Education Officer is available to provide education sessions and work with residents, community groups and schools on how best to reduce our waste to landfill. These sessions are free, engaging and informative.

To find out more:

Working in partnership with the NSW Environmental Trust and the NSW Environmental Protection Authority as part of the Waste Less, Recycle More intitiative, funded from the waste levy.

We're interested in your waste!

Wingecarribee Shire Council recognises the importance of working in partnership with the community to manage, reduce and avoid waste. Wingecarribee currently tops the State for recycling but we can still do better.

From time to time, Waste Wise in Wingecarribee will seek the opinion of residents. You will be able to complete surveys that will help us work together on reducing our waste to landfill. These surveys will contribute to how we undertake waste management in our Shire. Please take a few minutes to complete them and let us know how you are going with your domestic waste management.

Our Green Garden Bin and Community Recycling Centre surveys have concluded.

Also, Wingecarribee’s Waste Education Officer is available to provide education sessions and work with residents, community groups and schools on how best to reduce our waste to landfill. These sessions are free, engaging and informative.

To find out more:

Working in partnership with the NSW Environmental Trust and the NSW Environmental Protection Authority as part of the Waste Less, Recycle More intitiative, funded from the waste levy.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • I would like to congratulate the Waste Wise team for the excellent iniciatives: this question forum, the free workshops and the new self-serve bay at RRC. So many people want to do the right thing and may be unaware of how to best reduce household waste. I have recently changed our red bin pickup to fortnightly, with a savings of $100/year. By reducing waste, recycling, and composting, we can all do our part. Thank you!

    Gen asked almost 4 years ago

    Thanks Gen! It's always nice to receive positive comments and these have now been passed onto the Waste Wise team. Keep up the great work on your end.

  • Can you please explain why we can not put plastic bags or wrap in recycling when previously we could? Plus many packages come in plastic specify that they are recyclable.

    Mark & Therese asked about 4 years ago

    Hello

    Thank you for your enquiry. You raise two important points which we'd like to cover.

    1. LIGHT PLASTICS

    Plastic bags and light plastics such as glad wrap, cling film and candy wrappers have never been acceptable through the kerbside yellow lidded recycling bin. The primary reasons are:

    - plastic bags get caught up round the sorting machinery and stop it from working

    - light plastics get caught up with the paper at and contaminate the paper recycling stream rendering it non recyclable

    You can collect your light plastics and take them to the plastic bag recycling bins located in many supermarkets. They will get recycled into materials such as garden furniture. These recycling bins is not always easy to locate and tend to be tucked at the end of the entrance hall.

    2. PLASTICS IDENTIFICATION TRIANGLE

    If the triangle has a number in it, it is NOT as recycling triangle. This is a global symbol and due to the variety of materials now made from plastics it is best not to go by the number in the triangle as to whether it can go in your recycling bin. Go by the following rules:

    - does it hold its shape (e.g. flower pots, plastic tubs) or come back to its shape after a squeeze without shattering (e.g. tomato punnets, biscuit trays, plastic food containers, plastic cups), then it should be good to go in the yellow lidded recycling bin

    - if it shatters or breaks (e.g. foam meat trays, brittle plastics) then red bin it.

    - if it goes flat like paper (e.g. candy wrappers, glad wrap) then red bin it.

    We hope this helps explain why certain plastics cannot as yet be recycled through the kerbside recycling bin.

    For more information watch out for the Moss Vale Resource Recovery Centre site tours that will soon be advertised for 2016 where more of the mysteries and grey areas of recycling will be explained. 

    Regards

    The Wingecarribee Waste Wise Team


  • Why do l have pay for a green bin when l don't. Use It and from what see not many others do although. you. will come with. a large number. to make. it seem like. Every house. Is useing it

    Big al asked about 4 years ago

    Hello

    Thank you for your comment. It has been noted.

    Evidence from a recent survey of the garden organics kerbside bin shows that 86% of those who have the bin are satisfied with it. It may be that you will see more of the green bins out on the kerbside now that we are in the growing season.

    Regards

    The Waste Team

  • Does this mean that food scraps including meat scraps should go in the Green Bin ?

    jbtr asked about 4 years ago

    Hello

    No, food scraps cannot be placed in the Wingecarribee Shire garden organics bin at this moment in time.

    Council is currently providing free workshops to support residents in reducing their food waste to landfill via Home Composting. Please feel free to contact us if you do not know about these workshops and are interested in finding out more.

    Regards

    The Waste Team

  • Why does this Council charge ratepayers to take green waste to the Community Recycling Centre?

    Warren Fahey asked about 4 years ago

    Hello

    Thank you for your enquiry regarding charges for green waste at the Resource Recovery Centre.

    Once the organic materials arrive, they are:

    • checked through for contamination (plastic bags being the most common)
    • shredded
    • piled into windrows to 'cook'
    • turned, watered, aerated over a 3 to 5 month period
    • re-shredded as required
    • sieved into mulch and compost
    • tested regularly with samples sent to labs to ensure effective pasteurisation
    • and finally sent back out to parks and gardens in the Shire

    This is quite a lengthy and expensive process hence the need to charge for it at the gate.

    Regards

    The Waste Team